DIY Film School – LTW Services Pitch (MyEd)

The following resources were created during a ‘DIY Film School’ session at the LTW Staff Meeting on 13th July 2017, held at Dovecot Studios. Our challenge was for groups of ~5 to produce a video pitch for a randomly assigned LTW service. Our service was MyEd, the University’s web portal (available to applicants, students, staff, visitors and alumni).

MyEd Student and Staff Login

DIY Film School

Video is a powerful medium of communication for staff and students and doesn’t always need high-end production techniques to be effective. This session aims to give you the skills and confidence to beginning filming, using just your smart device.

Event booking details

Workshop process (step-by-step)

Finished video

Media Hopper channel

View all the other service pitch videos

Additional images

Flickr photo album

OER licences

Video – Copyright © University of Edinburgh 2017 CC BY-NC-SA
Photos – Copyright © Stewart Lamb Cromar University of Edinburgh 2017 CC BY-NC-SA

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.
Creative Commons licence summary (BY-NC-SA)

Tackling Barriers

In 2017 the University of Edinburgh’s Interactive Content service and Chest Heart & Stroke Scotland (CHSS) will celebrate the 10th anniversary of their collaborative and fruitful partnership – only last month both organisations were highly commended in the BMA Patient Information Awards 2016.

Over this past decade developing innovative e-learning resources together several major changes have taken place. The most impactful decision was hopefully making all content developed in-house available as Open Educational Resources (OERs) and Creative Commons licensed (CC BY-NC-ND as minimum).

Multilingual videos

This year the partnership has decided to support non-English languages and publish videos that cater to a wider, more inclusive, Scottish audience. Within CHSS the ‘Tackling Barriers’ programme has identified several key languages to target: Arabic, Chinese (Mandarin), Polish, Urdu, Bengali and Lithuanian.

At CHSS we aim to support people in their community. Many with low literacy and English as a second language are not engaging with our services. Through co-production with low literacy and BME organisations and their members we will shape the development of CHSS health information and services. We will do this from inception to conclusion to tackle the barriers to engagement with CHSS services. CHSS will share lessons learnt with other long term condition organisations.

At the time of publication there are now 8 different ‘Tackling Barriers’ videos online and with many more in the production pipeline. Each of these instructional videos show you how to use various inhaler devices (e.g. metered dose inhalers with spacer). They are all available for playback, embedding and download via Media Hopper, Vimeo and YouTube.

Please visit the My Lungs My Life (MLML) resource for more advice, support and information regarding chest illness:

#OER16 Open Culture

This years OER conference: #OER16 Open Culture was held in Edinburgh, which was great for the Interactive content team. Now in its 7th year the 2 day conference was a very full and diverse one with people attending from all over the world. There were keynote speakers, presentations, lightning talks, Wikipedia sessions and posters. Many of the presentations were live streamed and can be found on the ALT (Association for Learning Technology) YouTube channel.

What do we mean by open?
There were lots of thought provoking topics. From letting students choose how they learn to letting them use their own tools. From research into the effectiveness of OERs, who has heard of OERs, to what are OERs? Different areas of openness, open to whom and how. The area of copyright, creative commons licensing and ownership to archives and collections.

Day 1
Catherine Cronin, University of Galway, “If ‘open’ is the answer, what is the question?” the first keynote speech on day 1.

I am just covering the topics I attended on the day but there were other sessions in parallel to this. My first session was titled ‘Converging or diverging cultures of openness’:

  • Awareness of OER and OEP in Scotland: Survey Findings from the OEPS Project: this covered the findings of the survey which covered higher and further education. Some of the interesting things from this research is the need for staff development and sharing practices.
  • Veethika Mishra a student from India presented: GameEd Archive: OER for tabletop games: for such a large industry she emphasised that the educational value of table top games is underestimated and underutilised.
  • Mosomelt: Mobile Social Media Learning Technologies, NZ
  • Connecting Resources and Users – requirements for a federated cross-sectorial infrastructure for OER: feasibility study based in Germany around repositories, distribution and the needs of different educational sectors.
Doing OER: Stuart Nicol
Doing OER: Stuart Nicol

In the afternoon I attended the ‘Converging or diverging cultures of openness’ again which covered more aspects of OERs:

  • Finding the open in the in-between: changing culture and space in higher education: In-between: Third space, Third place, Liminality. Reuse, Revise, Remix, Redistribute, Retain.
  • Open Educational Resources and Tools for the Digital Student: collaboration between 2 universities one in Romania and the other the US, the students work together and share resources, using open educational tools and social media such as ThingLink, Google hangout, Voicethread and SoundCloud.
  • Doing OER: Developing an institutional OER policy and how that policy might influence practice. Open.ed Stuart Nicol
  • Converging Cultures of Open in Language Resources Development: Mining and data driven learning, linguistic data, FLAX project domain-specific language collections.
  • How to set up an Open Online CPD course: 12 Apps of Christmas. We should try this!

There were 2 keynote speakers following the sessions on day 1: Emma Smith, University of Oxford, “Free Willy: Shakespeare and OER” followed by John Scally, National Library of Scotland, “Postcards from the Open Road” to finish the presentations of the day.

Day 2
Day 2 started with an excellent keynote from Edupunk Jim Groom, Reclaim Hosting “Can we imagine tech Infrastructure as an Open Educational Resource? Or, Clouds, Containers, and APIs, Oh My!”.

My first session was called ‘Innovative approaches to opening up cultural heritage collections for education’:

  • Bastille, a pop group or a French Fort? How the Research and Education Space (RES) is using linked open data to open up cultural heritage collections so they can be used in education: a project funded by Jisc, the British Universities Film & Video Council (BUFVC) and the BBC
  • Learning Effectiveness and Perceived Value of Wikipedia as a Primary Course Resource: research based at the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya which compared sets of students using Wikipedia
  • Open education: “Runnin’ with the Devil”: are we critical in our thinking and writing? Paper citation, semantometrics and citation metrics

‘Hacking, making and sharing’

  • Students Success The Toolbox, realistic temptations Dublin
  • Open education on Wikipedia’s sister projects: Wikipedia is well known but there are a number of other equally interesting open projects such as Wikisource, Wikibooks where students can create their own textbooks
  • An Open Ed Tech Collective: looked at a WordPress framework SPLOT, NS Cloner for WordPress, Sandstorm
  • Building a Database of People in Edinburgh Throughout the Early 20th Century: student project, setting up a searchable database using old telephone directories

‘Strategic and reputational advantages of openness’

  • Reflecting back on the diverse innovations and impacts prompted by an OER project: OERhub Bridge to success, Badged open courses, no time constraint, no support
  • Reframing ‘open’ in the context of the Digital University: different levels of open, fuzziness, Third space thinking, ‘The Great Good Place’, Lead Scotland
  • Modern slavery Stolen Lives a project aimed to promote awareness of modern slavery
  • Need for a Culture of Sharing – A case study of Mauritian Educators: in certain schools there is a ‘culture of private tuition and fierce competition which inhibit open collaborative efforts’

Open with care: Melissa Highton
Open with care: Melissa Highton
The day and conference finished with the final keynote “Open with care” from our own Melissa Highton.

Jackie

Edinburgh University OER website launch

Last week we helped launch Open.Ed, a new website devoted to showcasing Open Educational Resources (OERs) at the University of Edinburgh.

Our Interactive Content service not only designed and built the site, but several of our OER-related projects are featured in the collection:

open-ed-001

Related links

ALD15 – Review

Summary

Tuesday the 13th of October was the inaugural Ada Lovelace Day (ALD) at the University of Edinburgh. The Interactive Content (IC) team were responsible for the design, development and facilitation of 5 key workshop activities. Not only did registered University students and staff enjoy the day, but so did a significant number of guests from the Edinburgh community.

OERs

All the team’s deliverables and handbooks were Creative Commons licensed (CC-BY-SA) for easy distribution and maximum reuse. N.B. This is Free Culture Licence.

Merchandise

In addition to the digital OERs published, the IC team designed a broad-range of ALD themed promotional materials including:

  • pull-up banners
  • tote bags
  • t-shirts
  • posters
  • cardboard cut-out

Social media statistics for the w/c 12OCT2015

  • 1K+ page views on the Ada Lovelace Day WordPress site
  • 1K+ votes and 13k+ page views for the LEGO ‘Lovelace & Babbage‘ project
  • 71 favourites and 48 retweets from the IC @Tweelearning Twitter account alone
    • Impressions: 9,447 (times people saw these Tweets on Twitter)
    • Total engagements: 665 (times people interacted with these Tweets)
  • ~400 unique Tweets using the official event hashtag #ALD15EdUni (via Topsy)

Guest Speaker

Katya Krasnopeeva from Pilizota Lab, within the School of Biological Sciences, very kindly gave an inspirational overview of her current research post. She even had a short video demonstrating how LEGO was used to help them out with a rather repetitive laboratory procedure.

Activity A – ‘Garden of Ada’

  • ‘Garden of Ada’ adult colouring-in illustration (.PDF + Flickr + Wikimedia Commons)
  • In addition to the standard A4 version given away, an A0 version was printed for a collaborative drawing exercise
    • Hand drawn by Interactive Content team member Jackie Aim

Activity B – Sonic Pi music compositions

  • Sonic Pi workshop handbook (.PDF)
    • ‘An introduction to Sonic Pi’ written by Interactive Content team member Stuart Brett

Official tweet

 

Activity C – LEGO® Raspberry Pi enclosure

  • LEGO Raspberry Pi enclosure workshop handbook (.PDF)
    • Written by Jackie Aim
  • LEGO Raspberry Pi enclosure photographs (Twitter + Flickr)

Activity D – Cardboard Raspberry Pi enclosure

  • Ada Lovelace Raspberry Pi cardboard enclosures (Purple .PDF + Blue .PDF)
    • Designed by Stuart Brett

purpleblue

Official tweet

 

Activity E – Ada selfies

  • Ada Lovelace cardboard cutout
    • Designed by Stuart Brett

Update 10NOV2015 – Wikipedia Contributions

    • With help from the very generous Sara Thomas (Museums Galleries Scotland – Wikimedia in Residence), one University of Edinburgh student made substantial additions to the Ada Lovelace Wikipedia page (Persian)

 

 


LEGO, the LEGO logo and the Minifigure are trademarks of the LEGO Group. ©2015 The LEGO Group.

HIV/AIDS online resources for teachers

Last Friday Lothian Health Services Archive (LHSA) launched a brand new website filled with educational resources, images and audio-visual material based on their UNESCO-awarded HIV/AIDS collections.

Over a 4 month development window, in close collaboration with LHSA Project Conservator Emily Hick, the Interactive Content team developed a showcase website that would house their collection in an attractive, functional and engaging design.

Each member of the team played an important role in different aspects of this multifaceted and exciting project. In a little under 20 total development days the following deliverables were achieved:

  • website design and development
    • WordPress bespoke theme (responsive)
    • parallax scrolling animation (CSS/jQuery)
  • design for print
    • Word/PDF templates
    • postcards (A6)
    • posters (A3)
  • audio/video editing and publishing
    • YouTube, Vimeo and SoundCloud
  • Jorum metadata creation and publishing
    • ~40 OER records shared

YouTube Subtitling Tutorial

Do you need help creating video subtitles?

Please download our CCBY3.0 licenced YouTube subtitle tutorial. There is a 12-page handbook with easy-to-follow instructions and a 20-slide PowerPoint for the workshop facilitator.

During a 2-hour workshop held on 23OCT2014, LTW staff members contributed over 10 video subtitle files (.srt) to Wikimedia Commons.

HEARTe: Cardiac Learning Resource

Scotland launches HEARTe: Free Cardiac Learning Resource

Health professionals across Scotland have welcomed HEARTe, the first comprehensive, web-based, free training programme for all health and social care staff caring for people with heart disease. Led by Scotland’s Health Charity, Chest Heart & Stroke Scotland (CHSS), the resource launches at a national heart conference in Stirling on November 29th.

CHSS has worked in partnership with NHS Scotland, British Heart Foundation (BHF) Scotland and the University of Edinburgh (Learning Technology Section) to produce HEARTe, which is funded by the Scottish Government through the National Advisory Committee for Heart Disease.

HEARTe Project Manager Suzanne Bell explained, “This new interactive online resource will improve the skills of health and social care staff and enhance the care of people living with heart disease across Scotland.”

Cabinet Secretary for Health and Wellbeing Alex Neil said: “We are delighted to have funded the HEARTe initiative. This is an excellent example of collaboration between the third sector and NHS Scotland, leading to an innovative educational resource for health and social care professionals. It will have real and positive impacts for people in Scotland and is a great practical illustration of our commitment to the 2020 Vision for health and social care services.”

Marjory Burns, Director at BHF Scotland, said: “HEARTe is a fantastic innovation that will enhance the skills of health and social professionals so they can continue to help BHF Scotland fight for every heartbeat.”

Development of HEARTe included the expert input of multi-disciplinary professions. The resulting resource has 7 core level modules to cover a range of different aspects of cardiac disease. These modules are healthy heart and common cardiac investigations, primary prevention, stable coronary heart disease, acute coronary syndromes, cardiac rehabilitation, heart failure, and palliative care in heart disease.

You can access this dynamic cardiac education tool after November 29th by visiting: